Corpus ID: 154662469

End of the Dialogue? Political Polarization, the Supreme Court, and Congress

@article{Hasen2012EndOT,
  title={End of the Dialogue? Political Polarization, the Supreme Court, and Congress},
  author={Richard L. Hasen},
  journal={Southern California Law Review},
  year={2012},
  volume={86},
  pages={205}
}
This Article considers the likely effects of continued political polarization on the relative power of Congress and the Supreme Court. Polarization already is leading to an increase the power of the Court against Congress, whether or not the Justices affirmatively seek that additional power. The governing model of Congressional-Supreme Court relations is that the branches are in dialogue on statutory interpretation: Congress writes federal statutes, the Court interprets them, and Congress has… Expand
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