End-of-life decision-making in six European countries: descriptive study

@article{Heide2003EndoflifeDI,
  title={End-of-life decision-making in six European countries: descriptive study},
  author={Aǵnes van der Heide and Luc Deliens and Karin Faisst and Tore Nilstun and Michael S Norup and Eugenio Paci and Gerrit van der Wal and Paul J. Maas},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2003},
  volume={362},
  pages={345-350}
}
BACKGROUND Empirical data about end-of-life decision-making practices are scarce. [...] Key Method All deaths arose between June, 2001, and February, 2002. We weighted data to correct for stratification and to make results representative for all deaths: results were presented as weighted percentages. FINDINGS The questionnaire response rate was 75% for the Netherlands, 67% for Switzerland, 62% for Denmark, 61% for Sweden, 59% for Belgium, and 44% for Italy. Total number of deaths studied was 20480.Expand
End-of-life decision-making in Belgium, Denmark, Sweden and Switzerland: does place of death make a difference?
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The results suggest the possibility that end-of-life decision-making is related to the care setting where people die, and seem to call for the development of good end-Of-life care options and end- of-life communication guidelines in all settings. Expand
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TLDR
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End-of-life medical decisions in France: a death certificate follow-up survey 5 years after the 2005 act of parliament on patients’ rights and end of life
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End-of-life decision making by Austrian physicians - a cross-sectional study
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The majority of doctors perform symptom control in terminally ill patients and the majority of physicians felt the legal situation with respect to measures to end life prematurely was ambiguous, which should help political decision-makers provide the necessary legal framework for end-of-life medical care. Expand
Physicians' attitudes towards end-of-life decisions: a comparison between seven countries.
TLDR
There was large variation in support--between and within countries--for medical decision that may result in the hastening of death, and a principal component factor analysis found that 58% of the variance of the responses is explained by four factors. Expand
Physicians' experiences with end-of-life decision-making: Survey in 6 European countries and Australia
TLDR
Physicians with training in palliative care are more inclined to perform ELDs, as are those who attend to higher numbers of terminal patients, and this seems not to be only a matter of opportunity, but also amatter of attitude. Expand
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