Enamel hypoplasias and physiological stress in the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene hominins.

@article{Cunha2004EnamelHA,
  title={Enamel hypoplasias and physiological stress in the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene hominins.},
  author={Eug{\'e}nia Cunha and Fernando V. Ramirez Rozzi and Jos{\'e} Mar{\'i}a Berm{\'u}dez de Castro and Mar{\'i}a Martin{\'o}n‐Torres and Sofia N. Wasterlain and Susana Sarmiento},
  journal={American journal of physical anthropology},
  year={2004},
  volume={125 3},
  pages={
          220-31
        }
}
This study presents an analysis of linear enamel hypoplasias (LEH) and plane-form defects (PFD) in the hominine dental sample from the Sima de los Huesos (SH) Middle Pleistocene site in Atapuerca (Spain). The SH sample comprises 475 teeth, 467 permanent and 8 deciduous, belonging to a minimum of 28 individuals. The method for recording PFD and LEH is discussed, as well as the definition of LEH. The prevalence of LEH and PFD in SH permanent dentition (unilateral total count) is 4.6% (13/280… 

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