Enamel Erosion by Some Soft Drinks and Orange Juices Relative to Their pH, Buffering Effect and Contents of Calcium Phosphate

@article{Larsen1998EnamelEB,
  title={Enamel Erosion by Some Soft Drinks and Orange Juices Relative to Their pH, Buffering Effect and Contents of Calcium Phosphate},
  author={M. Joost Larsen and Bente Nyvad},
  journal={Caries Research},
  year={1998},
  volume={33},
  pages={81 - 87}
}
The capability of a soft drink or a juice to erode dental enamel depends not only on the pH of the drink, but also on its buffering effect. As the latter is the ability of the drink to resist a change of pH it may add to the effects of the actual pH. The aim of the present study was to compare the pH and the buffering effect of various soft drinks with their erosive effects and the solubility of apatite. In 18 soft drinks, mineral waters and juices available on the Danish market, pH and the… 

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