Employment-Based Health Insurance and Job Mobility: Is There Evidence of Job-Lock?

@article{Madrian1993EmploymentBasedHI,
  title={Employment-Based Health Insurance and Job Mobility: Is There Evidence of Job-Lock?},
  author={Brigitte C. Madrian},
  journal={Labor: Supply \& Demand eJournal},
  year={1993}
}
  • Brigitte C. Madrian
  • Published 1 September 1993
  • Economics, Medicine
  • Labor: Supply & Demand eJournal
This paper assesses the impact of employer-provided health insurance on job mobility by exploring the extent to which workers are 'locked' into their jobs because preexisting conditions exclusions make it expensive for individuals with medical problems to relinquish their current health insurance. I estimate the degree of job-lock by comparing the difference in the turnover rates of those with high and low medical expenses for those with and without employer-provided health insurance. Using… 
Health Insurance and Job Mobility: The Effects of Public Policy on Job-Lock
The authors study a policy of limited insurance portability that has been adopted by a number of states and the federal government over the past 20 years. They find that these “continuation of
Does Government Health Insurance Reduce Job Lock and Job Push?
TLDR
Using variation in Medicaid eligibility among household members of male workers as a proxy for shifts in workers’ dependence on employment for health insurance, large job lock and job push effects are estimated.
Does Government Health Insurance Reduce Job Lock and Job Push ?
TLDR
Using variation in Medicaid eligibility among household members of male workers as a proxy for shifts in workers dependence on employment for health insurance, large job lock and job push effects are estimated.
Employer-Provided Health Insurance and the Incidence of 'Job-Lock': Is There a Consensus?
TLDR
This paper summarizes the current literature on the topic and presents some findings using the National Health Interview Survey, focusing on the 1997-2003 period, consistent with recent assertions that there is some evidence of job-lock.
Employer-Provided Health Insurance and the Incidence of 'Job-Lock': Is There a Consensus?
TLDR
The findings are consistent with recent assertions that there is some evidence of job-lock, and present some findings using the National Health Interview Survey, focusing on the 1997-2003 period.
The Effects of Employer-Provided Health Insurance on Worker Mobility
The authors use data from the 1984 Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) to investigate whether employer-provided health insurance reduced worker mobility (a phenomenon termed
Employer-Provided Health Insurance and Job Mobility: Did the A ffordable Care Act Reduce Job Lock?
Many have argued that concerns over health insurance reduce labor market mobility in the United States, causing a “job lock�? effect. We take advantage of the novel natural experiment created by the
Health Insurance and Job Mobility: Theoryand Evidence
It is widely hypothesized that health insurance deters job mobility because of imperfections in the labor and health insurance markets. This paper describes the nature of the welfare loss
Is There a Link between Employer-Provided Health Insurance and Job Mobility? Evidence from Recent Micro Data
TLDR
Evidence is presented from a quasi-natural experiment to suggest that the problem is a lack of viable alternative private sources of health insurance, and evidence that access to health insurance through one's spouse or partner dramatically increases voluntary job turnover.
Health Insurance, Job Lock, and the Supply of Self‐Employment
Unlike most wage earners, self‐employed Americans have limited access to health insurance and face higher costs. Thus, social commentators and policymakers argue that many potential entrepreneurs are
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References

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The link between health insurance and the workplace in the U.S. has led to concern over the possibility of insurance-induced reductions in job mobility or 'job-lock". Designing health insurance
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TLDR
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