Empirical evidence on induced traffic

@article{Goodwin1996EmpiricalEO,
  title={Empirical evidence on induced traffic},
  author={Phil B. Goodwin},
  journal={Transportation},
  year={1996},
  volume={23},
  pages={35-54}
}
  • P. Goodwin
  • Published 1 February 1996
  • Computer Science
  • Transportation
Disparate evidence indicates that the provision of extra road capacity results in a greater volume of traffic. The amount of extra traffic must be heavily dependent on the context, size and location of road schemes, but an appropriate average value is given by an elasticity of traffic volume with respect to travel time of about −0.5 in the short term, and up to −1.0 in the long term. As a result, an average road improvement has induced an additional 10% of base traffic in the short term and 20… 
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