Empirical evidence for a celestial origin of the climate oscillations and its implications

@article{Scafetta2010EmpiricalEF,
  title={Empirical evidence for a celestial origin of the climate oscillations and its implications},
  author={N. Scafetta},
  journal={Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics},
  year={2010},
  volume={72},
  pages={951-970}
}
  • N. Scafetta
  • Published 2010
  • Geology, Physics
  • Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics
  • We investigate whether or not the decadal and multi-decadal climate oscillations have an astronomical origin. Several global surface temperature records since 1850 and records deduced from the orbits of the planets present very similar power spectra. Eleven frequencies with period between 5 and 100 years closely correspond in the two records. Among them, large climate oscillations with peak-to-trough amplitude of about 0.1 and 0.251C, and periods of about 20 and 60 years, respectively, are… CONTINUE READING
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