Empirical evaluation of the uncanny valley hypothesis fails to confirm the predicted effect of motion

@article{Piwek2014EmpiricalEO,
  title={Empirical evaluation of the uncanny valley hypothesis fails to confirm the predicted effect of motion},
  author={Lukasz Piwek and Lawrie S. McKay and Peter Triantafillou},
  journal={Cognition},
  year={2014},
  volume={130},
  pages={271-277}
}
The uncanny valley hypothesis states that the acceptability of an artificial character will not increase linearly in relation to its likeness to human form. Instead, after an initial rise in acceptability there will be a pronounced decrease when the character is similar, but not identical to human form (Mori, 1970/2012). Moreover, it has been claimed but never directly tested that movement would accentuate this dip and make moving characters less acceptable. We used a number of full-body… CONTINUE READING
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