Empathy neglect: reconciling the spotlight effect and the correspondence bias.

@article{Epley2002EmpathyNR,
  title={Empathy neglect: reconciling the spotlight effect and the correspondence bias.},
  author={Nicholas Epley and Kenneth Savitsky and Thomas Gilovich},
  journal={Journal of personality and social psychology},
  year={2002},
  volume={83 2},
  pages={
          300-12
        }
}
When people commit an embarrassing blunder, they typically overestimate how harshly they will be judged by others. This tendency can seem to fly in the face of research on the correspondence bias, which has established that observers are, in fact, quite likely to draw harsh dispositional inferences about others. These seemingly inconsistent literatures are reconciled by showing that actors typically neglect to consider the extent to which observers will moderate their correspondent inferences… 

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