Emotions and Actions Associated with Altruistic Helping and Punishment

@article{Eldakar2006EmotionsAA,
  title={Emotions and Actions Associated with Altruistic Helping and Punishment},
  author={Omar Tonsi Eldakar and David Sloan Wilson and Rick O'Gorman},
  journal={Evolutionary Psychology},
  year={2006},
  volume={4}
}
Evolutionary altruism (defined in terms of fitness effects) exists in the context of punishment in addition to helping. We examine the proximate psychological mechanisms that motivate altruistic helping and punishment, including the effects of genetic relatedness, potential for future interactions, and individual differences in propensity to help and punish. A cheater who is a genetic relative provokes a stronger emotional reaction than a cheater who is a stranger, but the behavioral response… Expand

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