Emotional Experience Across Adulthood

@article{Charles2013EmotionalEA,
  title={Emotional Experience Across Adulthood},
  author={Susan T. Charles and Gloria Luong},
  journal={Current Directions in Psychological Science},
  year={2013},
  volume={22},
  pages={443 - 448}
}
  • S. Charles, G. Luong
  • Published 1 December 2013
  • Psychology
  • Current Directions in Psychological Science
Strength and vulnerability integration (SAVI) is a theoretical model that predicts changes in emotional experience across adulthood. A growing number of studies find that as people age, they become more adept at using thoughts and behaviors to avoid or mitigate exposure to negative experiences. People gradually acquire this expertise over a lifetime of experiences and are more motivated to regulate their emotions because of perceptions of time left to live. SAVI further posits that aging is… 
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Age, Rumination, and Emotional Recovery From a Psychosocial Stressor.
  • J. Robinette, S. Charles
  • Psychology
    The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences
  • 2016
TLDR
It is hypothesized that prolonged distress resulting from rumination has greater effects on the recovery of older than younger adults, suggesting age-specific risks associated with different types of emotion regulation strategies.
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