Emotion recognition/understanding ability in hearing or vision-impaired children: do sounds, sights, or words make the difference?

@article{Dyck2004EmotionRA,
  title={Emotion recognition/understanding ability in hearing or vision-impaired children: do sounds, sights, or words make the difference?},
  author={Murray J. Dyck and Charles Farrugia and Ian M Shochet and Martez Holmes-Brown},
  journal={Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines},
  year={2004},
  volume={45 4},
  pages={789-800}
}
BACKGROUND This study was designed to assess whether children with a sensory disability have consistent delays in acquiring emotion recognition and emotion understanding abilities. METHOD Younger (6-11 years) and older (12-18 years) hearing-impaired children (HI; n = 49), vision-impaired children (VI; n = 42), and children with no sensory impairment (NSI; n = 72) were assessed with the Emotion Recognition Scales (ERS), which include two tests of the ability to recognize vocal expressions of… CONTINUE READING
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