Emerging Adulthood in Europe: A Response to Bynner

@article{Arnett2006EmergingAI,
  title={Emerging Adulthood in Europe: A Response to Bynner},
  author={Jeffrey Jensen Arnett},
  journal={Journal of Youth Studies},
  year={2006},
  volume={9},
  pages={111 - 123}
}
  • J. Arnett
  • Published 1 February 2006
  • Psychology
  • Journal of Youth Studies
It is a great honor to have my theory of emerging adulthood addressed by John Bynner, a scholar whose work 1 have long admired, and an even great honor that he finds merit in my ideas and endorses the theory to a large extent. Bynner agrees with my argument that social, economic, and demographic changes over the past half-century have resulted in dramatic changes in what occurs during the late teens and early-to-midtwenties for most people in industrialized countries. Because most people now… 

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