Emergency treatment of anaphylactic reactions--guidelines for healthcare providers.

@article{Soar2008EmergencyTO,
  title={Emergency treatment of anaphylactic reactions--guidelines for healthcare providers.},
  author={J. Soar and R. Pumphrey and A. Cant and S. Clarke and A. Corbett and P. Dawson and P. Ewan and B. Fo{\"e}x and D. Gabbott and M. Griffiths and Judith Hall and N. Harper and F. Jewkes and I. Maconochie and S. Mitchell and S. Nasser and J. Nolan and G. Rylance and A. Sheikh and D. J. Unsworth and D. Warrell},
  journal={Resuscitation},
  year={2008},
  volume={77 2},
  pages={
          157-69
        }
}
*The UK incidence of anaphylactic reactions is increasing. *Patients who have an anaphylactic reaction have life-threatening airway and, or breathing and, or circulation problems usually associated with skin or mucosal changes. *Patients having an anaphylactic reaction should be treated using the Airway, Breathing, Circulation, Disability, Exposure (ABCDE) approach. *Anaphylactic reactions are not easy to study with randomised controlled trials. There are, however, systematic reviews of the… Expand

Paper Mentions

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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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Anaphylactic shock: no time to think.
TLDR
The management revolves around the use of adrenaline after an initial airway, breathing and circulation approach, in a dose of 0.5 mg 1:1,000 intramuscularly, repeated five minutes later if there has been no response. Expand
World Allergy Organization Guidelines for the Assessment and Management of Anaphylaxis
TLDR
The illustrated World Allergy Organization (WAO) Anaphylaxis guidelines focus on the supreme importance of making a prompt clinical diagnosis and on the basic initial treatment that is urgently needed and should be possible even in a low resource environment. Expand
Allergy And Anaphylaxis: Principles Of Acute Emergency Management.
TLDR
The research and evidence on the diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of anaphylaxis, as well as the utilization of epinephrine, both in and out of the hospital setting are assessed. Expand
Anaphylaxis: Early Recognition and Management
TLDR
Despite the release of a number of guidelines and updated practice on the management of anaphylaxis, there are identified gaps in knowledge and practice as well as barriers to care in emergency department (ED). Expand
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This document provides a broad consensus on the appropriate emergency management of acute anaphylactic reactions by first medical responders who are unlikely to have specialised knowledge. Expand
Emergency medical treatment of anaphylactic reactions
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This document provides a broad consensus on the appropriate emergency management of acute anaphylactic reactions by first medical responders who are unlikely to have specialised knowledge. Expand
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