Emergence of structural and dynamical properties of ecological mutualistic networks

@article{Suweis2013EmergenceOS,
  title={Emergence of structural and dynamical properties of ecological mutualistic networks},
  author={S. Suweis and F. Simini and J. Banavar and A. Maritan},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2013},
  volume={500},
  pages={449-452}
}
Mutualistic networks are formed when the interactions between two classes of species are mutually beneficial. They are important examples of cooperation shaped by evolution. Mutualism between animals and plants has a key role in the organization of ecological communities. Such networks in ecology have generally evolved a nested architecture independent of species composition and latitude; specialist species, with only few mutualistic links, tend to interact with a proper subset of the many… Expand
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