Emergence of linguistic laws in human voice

@article{Torre2017EmergenceOL,
  title={Emergence of linguistic laws in human voice},
  author={Iv{\'a}n Gonz{\'a}lez Torre and Bartolo Luque and Lucas Lacasa and Jordi Luque and Antoni Hern{\'a}ndez-Fern{\'a}ndez},
  journal={Scientific Reports},
  year={2017},
  volume={7}
}
Linguistic laws constitute one of the quantitative cornerstones of modern cognitive sciences and have been routinely investigated in written corpora, or in the equivalent transcription of oral corpora. This means that inferences of statistical patterns of language in acoustics are biased by the arbitrary, language-dependent segmentation of the signal, and virtually precludes the possibility of making comparative studies between human voice and other animal communication systems. Here we bridge… Expand
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