Emergence of a Habitable Planet

@article{Zahnle2007EmergenceOA,
  title={Emergence of a Habitable Planet},
  author={Kevin J. Zahnle and Nicholas T. Arndt and Charles S. Cockell and Alexander N. Halliday and Euan G. Nisbet and Franck Selsis and Norman H. Sleep},
  journal={Space Science Reviews},
  year={2007},
  volume={129},
  pages={35-78}
}
Abstract We address the first several hundred million years of Earth’s history. The Moon-forming impact left Earth enveloped in a hot silicate atmosphere that cooled and condensed over ∼1,000 yrs. As it cooled the Earth degassed its volatiles into the atmosphere. It took another ∼2 Myrs for the magma ocean to freeze at the surface. The cooling rate was determined by atmospheric thermal blanketing. Tidal heating by the new Moon was a major energy source to the magma ocean. After the mantle… 
Terrestrial aftermath of the Moon-forming impact
  • N. Sleep, K. Zahnle, R. Lupu
  • Geology
    Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences
  • 2014
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