Emergence of Novel Color Vision in Mice Engineered to Express a Human Cone Photopigment

@article{Jacobs2007EmergenceON,
  title={Emergence of Novel Color Vision in Mice Engineered to Express a Human Cone Photopigment},
  author={Gerald H. Jacobs and Gary A. Williams and Hugh B. Cahill and Jeremy Nathans},
  journal={Science},
  year={2007},
  volume={315},
  pages={1723 - 1725}
}
Changes in the genes encoding sensory receptor proteins are an essential step in the evolution of new sensory capacities. In primates, trichromatic color vision evolved after changes in X chromosome–linked photopigment genes. To model this process, we studied knock-in mice that expressed a human long-wavelength–sensitive (L) cone photopigment in the form of an X-linked polymorphism. Behavioral tests demonstrated that heterozygous females, whose retinas contained both native mouse pigments and… Expand
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