Emergence of Modern Human Behavior: Middle Stone Age Engravings from South Africa

@article{Henshilwood2002EmergenceOM,
  title={Emergence of Modern Human Behavior: Middle Stone Age Engravings from South Africa},
  author={C. Henshilwood and F. d'Errico and R. Yates and Z. Jacobs and C. Tribolo and G. Duller and N. Mercier and J. Sealy and H. Valladas and I. Watts and A. Wintle},
  journal={Science},
  year={2002},
  volume={295},
  pages={1278 - 1280}
}
  • C. Henshilwood, F. d'Errico, +8 authors A. Wintle
  • Published 2002
  • Medicine, Geography
  • Science
  • In the Eurasian Upper Paleolithic after about 35,000 years ago, abstract or depictional images provide evidence for cognitive abilities considered integral to modern human behavior. Here we report on two abstract representations engraved on pieces of red ochre recovered from the Middle Stone Age layers at Blombos Cave in South Africa. A mean date of 77,000 years was obtained for the layers containing the engraved ochres by thermoluminescence dating of burnt lithics, and the stratigraphic… CONTINUE READING
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