Embodying Power

@article{Garrison2016EmbodyingP,
  title={Embodying Power},
  author={Katie E Garrison and David Tang and Brandon J. Schmeichel},
  journal={Social Psychological and Personality Science},
  year={2016},
  volume={7},
  pages={623 - 630}
}
Adopting expansive (vs. contractive) body postures may influence psychological states associated with power. The current experiment sought to replicate and extend research on the power pose effect by adding another manipulation that embodies power—eye gaze. Participants (N = 305) adopted expansive (high power) or contractive (low power) poses while gazing ahead (i.e., dominantly) or down at the ground (i.e., submissively). Afterward, participants played a hypothetical ultimatum game, made a… Expand

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