Embodied Comprehension of Stories: Interactions between Language Regions and Modality-specific Neural Systems

@article{Chow2014EmbodiedCO,
  title={Embodied Comprehension of Stories: Interactions between Language Regions and Modality-specific Neural Systems},
  author={H. Chow and R. Mar and Yisheng Xu and Siyuan Liu and Suraji Wagage and A. Braun},
  journal={Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience},
  year={2014},
  volume={26},
  pages={279-295}
}
  • H. Chow, R. Mar, +3 authors A. Braun
  • Published 2014
  • Psychology, Medicine, Computer Science
  • Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
The embodied view of language processing proposes that comprehension involves multimodal simulations, a process that retrieves a comprehender's perceptual, motor, and affective knowledge through reactivation of the neural systems responsible for perception, action, and emotion. Although evidence in support of this idea is growing, the contemporary neuroanatomical model of language suggests that comprehension largely emerges as a result of interactions between frontotemporal language areas in… Expand
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