Elie Metchnikoff: Father of natural immunity

@article{Gordon2008ElieMF,
  title={Elie Metchnikoff: Father of natural immunity},
  author={Siamon Gordon},
  journal={European Journal of Immunology},
  year={2008},
  volume={38}
}
  • S. Gordon
  • Published 1 December 2008
  • Biology
  • European Journal of Immunology
We celebrate the centenary of the Nobel award to Elie Metchnikoff in 2008, shared with Paul Ehrlich, as respective pioneers of cellular and humoral immunology. Metchnikoff is rightly famous for his recognition of the biological significance of leukocyte recruitment and phagocytosis of microbes in host defence against infection, inflammation and immunity. As a comparative zoologist he utilised a broad range of model organisms for microscopic studies in vivo and in vitro. His work prefigures much… 

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...

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