Elements of Eoarchean life trapped in mineral inclusions

@article{Hassenkam2017ElementsOE,
  title={Elements of Eoarchean life trapped in mineral inclusions},
  author={Tue Hassenkam and M. P. Andersson and Kim N. Dalby and David M A Mackenzie and Minik T. Rosing},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2017},
  volume={548},
  pages={78-81}
}
Metasedimentary rocks from Isua, West Greenland (over 3,700 million years old) contain 13C-depleted carbonaceous compounds, with isotopic ratios that are compatible with a biogenic origin. Metamorphic garnet crystals in these rocks contain trails of carbonaceous inclusions that are contiguous with carbon-rich sedimentary beds in the host rock, where carbon is fully graphitized. Previous studies have not been able to document other elements of life (mainly hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen and… 
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