Electroreception, electrogenesis and electric signal evolution.

@article{Crampton2019ElectroreceptionEA,
  title={Electroreception, electrogenesis and electric signal evolution.},
  author={William G. R. Crampton},
  journal={Journal of fish biology},
  year={2019}
}
Electroreception, the capacity to detect external underwater electric fields with specialised receptors, is a phylogenetically widespread sensory modality in fishes and amphibians. In passive electroreception, a capacity possessed by c. 16% of fish species, an animal uses low-frequency-tuned ampullary electroreceptors to detect microvolt-range bioelectric fields from prey, without the need to generate its own electric field. In active electroreception (electrolocation), which occurs only in the… 
Electroreception in marine fishes: chondrichthyans.
TLDR
An up-to-date review of what is known about the biology of passive electroreception and how this knowledge can assist in understanding the ecological consequences of responding to electric and magnetic stimuli by electroreceptive fish in the marine environment is presented.
The captivating effect of electric organ discharges: species, sex, and orientation are embedded in every single received image.
TLDR
This work shows that the social species Brachyhypopomus gauderio uses electrotaxis to arrive abreast a conspecific, coming from behind, and indicates that these fish use the stimulus image profile as a spatial guidance clue to find a mate.
Hormone‐mediated modulation of the electromotor CPG in pulse‐type weakly electric fish. Commonalities and differences across species
TLDR
Despite major anatomo‐functional commonalities in the electromotor CPG across electric fish species, it is shown that Gymnotus omarorum and Brachyhypopomus gauderio have evolved divergent neural processes to transiently modify the CPG outputs through descending fast neurotransmitter inputs to generate communication signals.
Convergent mosaic brain evolution is associated with the evolution of novel electrosensory systems in teleost fishes
TLDR
The results show that evolving novel electrosensory systems is repeatedly and independently associated with changes in the sizes of individual brain regions independent of brain size, which suggests that selection can impact structural brain composition to favor specific regions involved in novel behaviors.
The ecology of electricity and electroreception.
TLDR
This work provides the first comprehensive collation and synthesis of research in this emerging field of electric ecology, including assessments of the role electricity plays in the natural ecology of predator-prey interactions, pollination, and animal dispersal, as well as the impact of anthropogenic activity on these systems.
Unexpected species diversity in electric eels with a description of the strongest living bioelectricity generator
TLDR
It is shown that there are three major lineages of Electrophorus distributed across Greater Amazonia and described two new species, one with a much stronger electric discharge than was previously known, making it the strongest living bioelectricity generator.
Spooky interaction at a distance in cave and surface dwelling electric fishes
TLDR
The strengths of electric discharges in cavefish were larger than in surface fish, which may be a correlate of increased reliance on electrosensory perception and larger size.
Transcriptome profiles of sturgeon lateral line electroreceptor and mechanoreceptor during regeneration
TLDR
Genes with specific expression in the two lateral line sensory organs suggests their important roles in mechanoreceptor and electroreceptor formation and the molecular basis for specification of these two sensory organs in sturgeon is suggested.
Organization of the cephalic lateral-line canals in Electrophorus varii de Santana, Wosiacki, Crampton, Sabaj, Dillman, Mendes-Júnior & Castro e Castro, 2019 (Gymnotiformes: Gymnotidae)
TLDR
This study provides the first detailed description of the development and organization of the cephalic lateral-line system in Electrophorus varii and supports a hypothesis of non-synchronized development.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 357 REFERENCES
The functional roles of passive electroreception in non-electric fishes
TLDR
The importance of electroreception to many species is emphasised by highlighting what still remains to be investigated, especially with respect to the physical, biochemical and neural properties of the ampullary organs and the signals that give rise to the large range of observed behaviours.
Electrocyte physiology: 50 years later
  • M. Markham
  • Biology
    Journal of Experimental Biology
  • 2013
TLDR
The history of research on electrocyte physiology in weakly electric fish, as well as recent discoveries of key phenomena not anticipated during early work in this field are reviewed.
The electric sense of weakly electric fish.
TLDR
Responses of ampullary electroreceptors to the animal's own EODs are centrally nulled by an elaborate and modifiable efference copy so that the animal is only informed about "nontrivial", low-frequency events in its environment.
Electroreception in Gymnotus carapo: pre-receptor processing and the distribution of electroreceptor types.
TLDR
The passive properties of the fish tissue represent a pre-receptor device that enhances exafferent and reafferent electrical signals at the fovea-parafoveal region, constituting the most efficient stimulus for electroreceptors.
Electroreception in the Guiana dolphin (Sotalia guianensis)
TLDR
The results show that electroreceptors can evolve from a mechanosensory organ that nearly all mammals possess and suggest the discovery of this kind of electroreception in more species, especially those with an aquatic or semi-aquatic lifestyle.
Electrolocation and jamming avoidance in the mormyrid fishBrienomyrus
TLDR
Brienomyrus resembles the unrelated South American pulse-speciesHypopygus in that it minimizes the chance of coincidences by specific, though different, EOD maneuvers to maintain its electrolocation ability.
Use of electroreception during foraging by the Australian lungfish
TLDR
Results show that N. forsteri is capable of perceiving the weak electric fields surrounding living animals, and suggest that it uses this information when foraging to locate prey hidden from view.
Evolutionary designs for electric signals and electroreceptors in gymnotoid fishes of Surinam
TLDR
Field collections of gymnotoid electric fish in coastal Surinam streams yielded 11 species belonging to two families, one of which showed ecological preferences for one habitat or another, and no general correlation was found between EOD form and habitat type.
...
...