Electrophysiological effects of sustained delivery of CRF and its receptor agonists in hippocampal slices

@article{Rebaudo2001ElectrophysiologicalEO,
  title={Electrophysiological effects of sustained delivery of CRF and its receptor agonists in hippocampal slices},
  author={R. Rebaudo and Raffaella Melani and Maurizio Balestrino and N. L. Izvarina},
  journal={Brain Research},
  year={2001},
  volume={922},
  pages={112-117}
}

Corticotropin-releasing factor and urocortin I activate CREB through functionally selective G bc signaling in hippocampal pyramidal neurons

Novel molecular mechanisms by which stress can directly impact hippocampal neurons are suggested, as well as an emerging role for Gbc signaling in mediating the effects of stress peptides in extrahypothalamic stress-responsive brain regions are highlighted.

Chronic Cocaine Enhances Corticotropin-Releasing Factor-Dependent Potentiation of Excitatory Transmission in Ventral Tegmental Area Dopamine Neurons

Enhanced CRF-induced potentiation of excitatory synaptic transmission onto VTA dopamine neurons after cocaine preexposure is likely to produce an abnormal increase in dopamine release during stressful events and could augment activation of addictive behaviors in response to stress.

Corticotropin‐releasing factor and urocortin I activate CREB through functionally selective Gβγ signaling in hippocampal pyramidal neurons

Novel molecular mechanisms by which stress can directly impact hippocampal neurons are suggested, and an emerging role for Gβγ signaling in mediating the effects of stress peptides in extrahypothalamic stress‐responsive brain regions is highlighted.

Characterization of the role of corticotropin-releasing hormone and opioid peptides on hippocampal neurodegeneration and functional recovery following global cerebral ischemia in rats

Investigation of the role of CRH and opioid peptides and receptors in the modulation of neuronal damage induced by an ischemic insult revealed neuronal protection conferred by the opioid kappa and delta receptor agonists, and a reduction ofCRH-induced neuronal protection when these opioids were blocked prior CRH administration.

Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Modulation of Forebrain GABAergic Transmission has a Pivotal Role in the Expression of Anabolic Steroid-Induced Anxiety in the Female Mouse

It is demonstrated that chronic, but not acute, exposure of female mice during adolescence to AAS augments anxiety-like behaviors; effects that were blocked by central infusion of the CRF receptor type 1 antagonist, antalarmin.

Activation of CRH receptor type 1 expressed on glutamatergic neurons increases excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons by the modulation of voltage-gated ion channels

The results suggest that CRH does not affect synaptic transmission per se, but modulates voltage-gated ion currents important for the generation of APs and hence elevates by this route overall neuronal activity.

Corticotropin-releasing factor induces functional and structural synaptic remodelling in acute stress

Corticotropin-releasing factor rapidly enhances synaptic communication in the hippocampus, potentially playing a crucial role in the enhanced memory consolidation in acute stress.

References

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The results indicate that CRF enhanced memory indirectly through NMDA receptor mediation also and MK801 successfully antagonized the memory‐facilitating effect of NE in the DG, and suggest that the same neuropeptide/neurotransmitter interactions may have other physiological and neuropathological implications.

Corticotropin-releasing factor injected into the lateral septum improves memory function in rats.

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The findings support the notion that the lateral septum is involved in the memory process and emotional expression and suggest that CRF probably produces a consistent facilitatory effect upon memory consolidation and inhibitory effect upon exploration within the limbic system in rats.

Impaired stress response and reduced anxiety in mice lacking a functional corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1

It is shown that in mice lacking Crhr1, the medulla of the adrenal gland is atrophied and stress-induced release of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone is reduced and the homozygous mutants exhibit increased exploratory activity and reduced anxiety-related behaviour under both basal conditions and following alcohol withdrawal.