Electrophysiological correlates of sleep homeostasis in freely behaving rats.

@article{Vyazovskiy2011ElectrophysiologicalCO,
  title={Electrophysiological correlates of sleep homeostasis in freely behaving rats.},
  author={V. Vyazovskiy and C. Cirelli and G. Tononi},
  journal={Progress in brain research},
  year={2011},
  volume={193},
  pages={
          17-38
        }
}
The electrical activity of the brain does not only reflect the current level of arousal, ongoing behavior, or involvement in a specific task but is also influenced by what kind of activity, and how much sleep and waking occurred before. The best marker of sleep-wake history is the electroencephalogram (EEG) spectral power in slow frequencies (slow-wave activity, 0.5-4 Hz, SWA) during sleep, which is high after extended wakefulness and low after consolidated sleep. While sleep homeostasis has… Expand
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