Electroconvulsive shock increases endogenous monoamine oxidase inhibitor activity in brain and cerebrospinal fluid.

Abstract

Chronic daily administration of electroconvulsive shock (ECS) to cats resulted in a progressive elevation of seizure threshold which was accompanied by a sustained elevation in the activity of an endogenous monoamine oxidase inhibitor (EMAOI) present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The increase in EMAOI activity in CSF following chronic ECS was observed maximally at 24-48 h. In rats, a single application of ECS resulted in a rapid but short-lasting increase in EMAOI activity present in the crude membrane fraction from brain. These findings demonstrate that both acute and chronic ECS modify the activity of an EMAOI in brain and CSF which may contribute to both the antidepressant and anticonvulsant effects of ECS treatment.

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@article{Isaac1986ElectroconvulsiveSI, title={Electroconvulsive shock increases endogenous monoamine oxidase inhibitor activity in brain and cerebrospinal fluid.}, author={Lydia Isaac and Robert Schoenbeck and Janina Bacher and Phil Skolnick and Shipra Paul}, journal={Neuroscience letters}, year={1986}, volume={66 3}, pages={257-62} }