Electrical versus pharmacological cardioversion for emergency department patients with acute atrial fibrillation (RAFF2): a partial factorial randomised trial

@article{Stiell2020ElectricalVP,
  title={Electrical versus pharmacological cardioversion for emergency department patients with acute atrial fibrillation (RAFF2): a partial factorial randomised trial},
  author={Ian G. Stiell and Marco L A Sivilotti and Monica Taljaard and David H. Birnie and Alain Vadeboncoeur and Corinne M. Hohl and Andrew D. McRae and Brian H. Rowe and Robert J. Brison and Venkatesh Thiruganasambandamoorthy and Laurent Macle and Bjug Borgundvaag and Judy Morris and {\'E}ric Mercier and Catherine M. Clement and Jennifer Brinkhurst and Connor Sheehan and Erica Brown and Marie-Joe Nemnom and George A Wells and Jeffrey J Perry},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2020},
  volume={395},
  pages={339-349}
}
BACKGROUND Acute atrial fibrillation is the most common arrythmia treated in the emergency department. Our primary aim was to compare conversion to sinus rhythm between pharmacological cardioversion followed by electrical cardioversion (drug-shock), and electrical cardioversion alone (shock-only). Our secondary aim was to compare the effectiveness of two pad positions for electrical cardioversion. METHODS We did a partial factorial trial of two protocols for patients with acute atrial… 
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