Electrical studies in the diagnosis of compression of the lumbar root.

@article{Leyshon1981ElectricalSI,
  title={Electrical studies in the diagnosis of compression of the lumbar root.},
  author={A. Leyshon and E. Kirwan and C. Parry},
  journal={The Journal of bone and joint surgery. British volume},
  year={1981},
  volume={63-B 1},
  pages={
          71-5
        }
}
A series of 100 patients with pain in the leg was studied and the accuracy of electrical studies in the diagnosis of nerve root lesions was investigated before operation. The electrical studies which were performed on all the patients, included recordings of fibrillation potentials, H-reflex and ankle reflex latencies. This diagnosis technique was found to be more accurate than radiculography or clinical examination and did not give false evidence. Seventy patients were classed as having a… Expand
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