Electrical stimulation versus voluntary exercise in strengthening thigh musculature after anterior cruciate ligament surgery.

@article{Delitto1988ElectricalSV,
  title={Electrical stimulation versus voluntary exercise in strengthening thigh musculature after anterior cruciate ligament surgery.},
  author={Anthony Delitto and Steven J. Rose and J M McKowen and Richard C Lehman and J. Alex Thomas and R A Shively},
  journal={Physical therapy},
  year={1988},
  volume={68 5},
  pages={
          660-3
        }
}
Twenty patients who had undergone anterior cruciate ligament reconstructive surgery were placed randomly and independently in an Electrical Stimulation Group (n = 10) or Voluntary Exercise Group (n = 10) to compare the effectiveness of these two muscle-strengthening protocols. Patients in both groups used simultaneous contraction of quadriceps femoris and hamstring muscles during a training regimen that consisted of either voluntary exercise or electrical stimulation trials five days a week for… 

Equal effectiveness of electrical and volitional strength training for quadriceps femoris muscles after anterior cruciate ligament surgery

It is suggested that neuromuscular electrical stimulation and voluntary muscle contraction treatments, when performed at the same intensity, are equally effective in strengthening skeletal muscle that has been weakened by surgical repair of the anterior cruciate ligament.

Electrical stimulation versus electromyographic biofeedback in the recovery of quadriceps femoris muscle function following anterior cruciate ligament surgery.

It is concluded that bio feedback is more effective than electrical stimulation in facilitating the recovery of peak torque and that biofeedback is comparable to Electrical stimulation in the Recovery of active knee extension.

Strength of the quadriceps femoris muscle and functional recovery after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. A prospective, randomized clinical trial of electrical stimulation.

There was a clinically and statistically significant difference in the recovery of the quadriceps and the gait parameters according to the type of operation that had been performed: the patients who had had reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament with use of an autologous patellar-ligament graft did poorly compared with the other patients.

Electromyographic biofeedback and recovery of quadriceps femoris muscle function following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

It is demonstrated that the addition of biofeedback to muscle strengthening exercises facilitates the rate of recovery of quadriceps femoris muscle function following ACL reconstruction.

Neuromuscular electrical stimulation after anterior cruciate ligament surgery.

It is concluded that neuromuscular electrical stimulation in combination with an early exercise therapy regimen is not significantly more effective in reducing weakening than an early Exercise therapy regimen alone after anterior cruciate ligament surgery.

The Effectiveness of Supplementing a Standard Rehabilitation Program With Superimposed Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

Intensive garment-integrated stimulation combined with standard rehabilitation is effective at accelerating recovery after knee surgery and shows a significant difference in mean improvement for the baseline corrected Lysholm score.

Early rehabilitation with weight-bearing standing-shaking-board exercise in combination with electrical muscle stimulation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

This rehabilitation method makes it possible to contract fast-twitch muscles, which may be a useful for improving extensor muscle strength after ACL reconstruction, and showed significant improvement after one month compared to group T.

Effect of early implementation of electrical muscle stimulation to prevent muscle atrophy and weakness in patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

Functional electrical stimulation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a randomized controlled pilot study

Quadriceps FES combined with traditional rehabilitation is a feasible, early intervention treatment option, post-ACLR, and was more effective in recovering quadriceps muscle strength than was NMES at 4 weeks post-surgery.

Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Superimposed on Movement Early after ACL Surgery

These results suggest that an early intervention based on NMES superimposed on repeated STSTS exercises is effective for recovering quadriceps strength and symmetry in lower extremity loading by the time of return to sport.
...

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