Electrical stimulation for preventing and treating post-stroke shoulder pain: a systematic Cochrane review

@article{Price2001ElectricalSF,
  title={Electrical stimulation for preventing and treating post-stroke shoulder pain: a systematic Cochrane review},
  author={Christopher I. Price and Anand Pandyan},
  journal={Clinical Rehabilitation},
  year={2001},
  volume={15},
  pages={19 - 5}
}
Background: Shoulder pain after stroke is common and disabling. The optimal management is uncertain, but electrical stimulation (ES) is often used to treat and prevent pain. Objectives: The objective of this review was to determine the efficacy of any form of surface ES in the prevention and/or treatment of pain around the shoulder at any time after stroke. Search strategy: We searched the Cochrane Stroke Review Group trials register and undertook further searches of Medline, Embase and CINAHL… Expand
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TLDR
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