Elective non-therapeutic intensive care and the four principles of medical ethics

@article{Baumann2013ElectiveNI,
  title={Elective non-therapeutic intensive care and the four principles of medical ethics},
  author={Antoine Baumann and G{\'e}rard Audibert and Caroline Guibet Lafaye and Louis Puybasset and Paul Michel Mertes and Fr{\'e}d{\'e}rique Claudot},
  journal={Journal of Medical Ethics},
  year={2013},
  volume={39},
  pages={139 - 142}
}
The chronic worldwide lack of organs for transplantation and the continuing improvement of strategies for in situ organ preservation have led to renewed interest in elective non-therapeutic ventilation of potential organ donors. Two types of situation may be eligible for elective intensive care: patients definitely evolving towards brain death and patients suitable as controlled non-heart beating organ donors after life-supporting therapies have been assessed as futile and withdrawn. Assessment… 
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