Ejaculate Cost and Male Choice

@article{Dewsbury1982EjaculateCA,
  title={Ejaculate Cost and Male Choice},
  author={Donald A. Dewsbury},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={1982},
  volume={119},
  pages={601 - 610}
}
  • D. Dewsbury
  • Published 1 May 1982
  • Biology
  • The American Naturalist
According to much evolutionary thinking, males of promiscuous species are able to produce quantities of sperm that are virtually unlimited and should be selected to mate indiscriminately with all available females. However, sperm are generally delivered in batches (ejaculates or spermatophores) that may include many millions of gametes. Males are limited with respect to the number of ejaculates they can deliver and the time required to restore depleted reserves. Because ejaculates are a limited… 
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Butterflies tailor their ejaculate in response to sperm competition risk and intensity
  • N. Wedell, P. A. Cook
  • Biology
    Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 1999
TLDR
It is clear from this study that males are sensitive to factors affecting sperm competition risk, tailoring their ejaculates as predicted by recent theoretical models.
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  • Biology
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TLDR
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