Einstein’s cosmic model of 1931 revisited: an analysis and translation of a forgotten model of the universe

@article{ORaifeartaigh2014EinsteinsCM,
  title={Einstein’s cosmic model of 1931 revisited: an analysis and translation of a forgotten model of the universe},
  author={Cormac O’Raifeartaigh and Brendan McCann},
  journal={The European Physical Journal H},
  year={2014},
  volume={39},
  pages={63-85}
}
Abstract We present an analysis and translation of Einstein’s 1931 paper “Zum kosmologischen Problem der allgemeinen Relativitätstheorie” or “On the cosmological problem of the general theory of relativity”. In this little-known paper, Einstein proposes a cosmic model in which the universe undergoes an expansion followed by a contraction, quite different to the monotonically expanding Einstein-de Sitter model of 1932. The paper offers many insights into Einstein’s cosmology in the light of the… Expand

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