Eighteen days of "living high, training low" stimulate erythropoiesis and enhance aerobic performance in elite middle-distance runners.

@article{Brugniaux2006EighteenDO,
  title={Eighteen days of "living high, training low" stimulate erythropoiesis and enhance aerobic performance in elite middle-distance runners.},
  author={Julien Vincent Brugniaux and Laurent Schmitt and Paul Robach and G{\'e}rard Nicolet and J P Fouillot and St{\'e}phane Mout{\'e}reau and Françoise Lasne and Vincent Pialoux and Philippe Saas and Marie-Claude Chorvot and J{\'e}r{\'e}my Cornolo and Niels V. Olsen and Jean Paul Richalet},
  journal={Journal of applied physiology},
  year={2006},
  volume={100 1},
  pages={
          203-11
        }
}
The efficiency of "living high, training low" (LHTL) remains controversial, despite its wide utilization. This study aimed to verify whether maximal and/or submaximal aerobic performance were modified by LHTL and whether these effects persist for 15 days after returning to normoxia. Last, we tried to elucidate whether the mechanisms involved were only related to changes in oxygen-carrying capacity. Eleven elite middle-distance runners were tested before (Pre), at the end (Post1), and 15 days… 
Living high–training low: effect on erythropoiesis and maximal aerobic performance in elite Nordic skiers
TLDR
It is suggested that increasing the altitude up to 3,500 m during Hi–Lo stimulates erythropoiesis but does not confer any advantage for maximal O2 transport.
Living high-training low: tolerance and acclimatization in elite endurance athletes
TLDR
Comparison of the three patterns of training suggests that a LHTL session should not exceed 3,000 m, for at least 18 days, with a minimum of 12 h day−1 of exposure.
Thirteen days of “live high–train low” does not affect prooxidant/antioxidant balance in elite swimmers
TLDR
The LHTL did not affect the antioxidant status in elite swimmers; however, the normoxic endurance training induced preconditioning mechanisms in response to the 4,800 m test.
The effect of intermittent hypoxic training on performance
TLDR
The addition of IHT into the normal training programme of well-trained athletes produced worthwhile gains in 30-s sprint performance possibly through enhanced glycolysis.
Influence of Hypoxia Training on the Aerobic Capacity of an Elite Race Walker
TLDR
The combination of two methods of hypoxic training improved the aerobic capacity of the test subject, but an improvement in the analyzed hematological indicators was observed only after LH + TL training.
Influence of “living high–training low” on aerobic performance and economy of work in elite athletes
TLDR
HL had a greater increase in PPO than LL during the post-altitude period, and the efficiency of Hi–Lo is also evidenced 15 days later by higher $$\dot{V}\hbox{O}_{2}{2}$$ and power at RCP.
Effect of intermittent hypoxic training on 20 km time trial and 30 s anaerobic performance
TLDR
The addition of IHT to the normal training program of well‐trained athletes produced worthwhile gains in 30‐s sprint performance possibly through enhanced glycolysis.
Increased Hypoxic Dose After Training at Low Altitude with 9h Per Night at 3000m Normobaric Hypoxia.
TLDR
It is recommended that, in the context of an altitude training camp at low altitudes (~1400 m) the addition of a relatively short exposure to simulated altitudes of 3000 m can elicit physiological and performance benefits, without compromise to training intensity or competition preparation.
Endurance, aerobic high-intensity, and repeated sprint cycling performance is unaffected by normobaric “Live High-Train Low”: a double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over study
TLDR
6 weeks of normobaric LHTL using altitude tents simulating altitudes of 2500–3500 m conducted in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled cross-over design do not affect power output during an incremental test, a ~26-km time-trial test, or 3-min all-out exercise in highly trained triathletes.
Same Performance Changes after Live High-Train Low in Normobaric vs. Hypobaric Hypoxia
TLDR
Investigation of physiological and performance parameters after a Live High-Train Low (LHTL) altitude camp in normobaric (NH) or hypobaric hypoxia (HH) to reproduce the actual training practices of endurance athletes using a crossover-designed study found increases in VO2max and performance enhancement were similar between NH and HH conditions.
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TLDR
The results indicate that LHTL may stimulate red cell production, without any concurrent amelioration of aerobic performance, and the absence of any prolonged benefit after L HTL suggests that this LHTl model cannot be recommended for long-term purposes.
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