Eggshell strength of an obligate brood parasite: a test of the puncture resistance hypothesis

@article{Antonov2005EggshellSO,
  title={Eggshell strength of an obligate brood parasite: a test of the puncture resistance hypothesis},
  author={Anton Antonov and B{\aa}rd G Stokke and Arne Moksnes and Oddmund Kleven and Marcel Honza and Eivin R{\o}skaft},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2005},
  volume={60},
  pages={11-18}
}
Eggs of several brood parasites have thicker and stronger shells than expected for their size. The present study evaluated the puncture resistance hypothesis for the occurrence of thick-shelled eggs in common cuckoos Cuculus canorus by investigating costs of cuckoo egg ejection in four Acrocephalus warblers—the great reed warbler A. arundinaceus, reed warbler A. scirpaceus, marsh warbler A. palustris and sedge warbler A. schoenobaenus. The three latter species all suffered ejection costs, while… 
Responses of Reed Warblers Acrocephalus scirpaceus to Non-Mimetic Eggs of Different Sizes in a Nest Parasitism Experiment
TLDR
Egg size differences apparently affect the mode and speed but not the rate of egg rejection in this host population of Reed Warbler Acrocephalus scirpaceus parasitized by Common Cuckoos Cuculus canorus.
How strong are eggs of the common cuckoo Cuculus canorus?
TLDR
Analysis of characteristics of a sample of freshly laid eggs of the common cuckoo with two of its major hosts, the reed warbler Acrocephalus scirpaceus and great reed Warbler, and of species with known puncture resistant eggs found that in puncture resistance tests cuckoos eggs tolerated on average 231 g and this trait probably represents an adaptation for a brood parasitic life style.
Does the cuckoo benefit from laying unusually strong eggs?
Egg rejection behaviour in the great reed warbler (Acrocephalus arundinaceus): the effect of egg type
TLDR
The observations suggest the lack of plasticity in the mode and timing of ejection behaviour towards experimental cuckoo eggs of different types in great reed warblers.
Alternative mechanisms of increased eggshell hardness of avian brood parasites relative to host species
TLDR
Eggshell characteristics did not differ between parasite eggs sampled from different host nests in distant geographical sites, suggesting an evolutionarily shared microstructural mechanism of stronger parasite eggshells across diverse host-races of brood parasitic cuckoos.
Eggshell characteristics and yolk composition in the common cuckoo Cuculus canorus: are they adapted to brood parasitism?
TLDR
The results suggest that cuckoo females increase the size, growth rate and competitive ability of their young by providing them with more nutrients and more dietary antioxidants for embryonic development, and not through elevated yolk testosterone or antibody levels.
Experimental evidence for an antipredatory function of egg rejection behaviour in a common host of the brood-parasitic shiny cowbird
TLDR
It is shown that pure white eggs increase the risk of nest predation compared to spotted host and cowbird eggs in a common large-sized host, the chalk-browed mockingbird (Mimus saturninus), highlighting the importance of considering the role of nestpredation in the expression of hosts’ strategies against parasitism.
Why do brood parasitic birds lay strong-shelled eggs?
TLDR
How quanti-cation of rejection modes (grasp ejection, puncture ejection and desertion) may disclose the validity of the puncture resistance hypothesis is discussed, and proposals for future studies to test their validity are provided.
The use of Sympatric Reed Warblers Acrocephalus scirpaceus and Marsh Warblers Acrocephalus palustris as Breeding Hosts: Parasitism Rates and Breeding Success of Common Cuckoos Cuculus canorus
TLDR
The level of parasitism, rejection rates and breeding success of the Common Cuckoo Cuculus canorus parasitising two sympatric species of Acrocephalus warblers breeding in western Poland is investigated.
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