Egg recognition and counting reduce costs of avian conspecific brood parasitism

@article{Lyon2003EggRA,
  title={Egg recognition and counting reduce costs of avian conspecific brood parasitism},
  author={Bruce E. Lyon},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2003},
  volume={422},
  pages={495-499}
}
  • B. Lyon
  • Published 3 April 2003
  • Biology
  • Nature
Birds parasitized by interspecific brood parasites often adopt defences based on egg recognition but such behaviours are puzzlingly rare in species parasitized by members of the same species. Here I show that conspecific egg recognition is frequent, accurate and used in three defences that reduce the high costs of conspecific brood parasitism in American coots. Hosts recognized and rejected many parasitic eggs, reducing the fitness costs of parasitism by half. Recognition without rejection also… 
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The model shows that male recognition by learning is disadvantageous unless the host has monomorphic eggs and suggests that interclutch variation in egg phenotype is the key to understanding the evolution of egg recognition and the sex involved.
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Costs and response to conspecific brood parasitism by colonial red-breasted mergansers
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The study indicates that costs of CBP to hosts during nesting may be limited to those red-breasted mergansers incubating the largest clutches, and it raises questions about the adaptive significance of deserting a parasitized clutch.
Parasitic Behaviour of Interspecific Brood Parasitic Females 18
TLDR
This chapter summarizes information on the behaviour of parasitic females from the moment they start searching for host nests until they parasitize them, and reviews the different hypotheses for explaining the recognition of hosts and the cues used to search for and locate their nests.
Parasitic Behaviour of Interspecific Brood Parasitic Females
TLDR
This chapter summarizes information on the behaviour of parasitic females from the moment they start searching for host nests until they parasitize them, and reviews the different hypotheses for explaining the recognition of hosts and the cues used to search for and locate their nests.
Egg Recognition in Japanese Quail
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It is shown that females can learn to recognise the salient characteristics of eggs from a given clutch and can use this learned template to discriminate against foreign eggs with a high probability when the eggs are phenotypically distinct.
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