Egg adoption can explain joint egg-laying in common eiders

@article{Robertson1998EggAC,
  title={Egg adoption can explain joint egg-laying in common eiders},
  author={Gregory J. Robertson},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={1998},
  volume={43},
  pages={289-296}
}
  • G. Robertson
  • Published 24 August 1998
  • Biology, Environmental Science
  • Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
Abstract Hypotheses regarding the evolution and maintenance of intraspecific nest parasitism were tested with data collected during a 3-year study of common eiders (Somateria mollissima) breeding near Churchill, Manitoba. The nest parasitism rate was highest (42.4% of nests) during the year with the highest nest density and the best environmental conditions, and lowest (20.2% of nests) in the year with the lowest nest density and the poorest environmental conditions. Over the nesting season… 
Brood Parasitism and Nest Takeover in Common Eiders
TLDR
Protein fingerprinting of egg albumen is used to distinguish the eggs from different females and to estimate the frequency, pattern and tactics of CBP and other forms of mixed maternity in a Hudson Bay population of common eiders, indicating that traditional non-molecular methods of identifying foreign eggs may considerably underestimate the frequency of mixed clutches.
Brood parasitism, female condition and clutch reduction in the common eider Somateria mollisima
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Meta-analysis of this and 3 other eider studies shows that there is a cost of being parasitised in this precocial species: host females laid on average 7% fewer eggs than other females, and there was no evidence of low condition in parasites.
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  • Biology, Environmental Science
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  • 1999
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An alternative or complementary explanation is presented: parasites preferentially target nests where the predatory risk is intrinsically lower, and females can detect variation and use this information to target nests of low predation risk as sites for laying parasitically.
Conspecific Brood Parasitism in Common Eiders (Somateria mollissima): Do Brood Parasites Target Safe Nest Sites?
TLDR
Nest-site safety did not explain patterns of CBP among habitats, given that nests in dense woody vegetation had the highest probability of survival yet had the lowest frequency of CBPs, and explanations are proposed for why this data did not support the risk assessment hypothesis.
Parasitic common goldeneye (Bucephala clangula) females lay preferentially in safe neighbourhoods
  • H. Pöysä
  • Environmental Science, Biology
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • 2003
TLDR
Parasites laid eggs in the experimental boxes independently of the simulated predation risk, suggesting that they do not use broken eggs or nest disarray as indicators of predation intensity, and Assuming that females in high risk areas have had experience of nest predation, they may take this into account in selecting host nests.
CONSPECIFIC BROOD PARASITISM IN COMMON EIDERS (SOMATERIA MOLLISSIMA): DO BROOD PARASITES TARGET SAFE NEST SITES?
TLDR
Nest-site safety did not explain patterns of CBP among habitats, given that nests in dense woody vegetation had the highest probability of survival yet had the lowest frequency, and explanations are proposed for why this data did not support the risk assessment hypothesis.
Do parasitic common goldeneye Bucephala clangula females choose nests on the basis of host traits or nest site traits
TLDR
It is found that the occurrence of CBP was better explained by nest-site characteristics than host traits, implying that parasitic females target a given nest based on factors related to the nest site itself rather than on the host.
Conspecific Brood Parasitism and Nesting Biology of Mandarin Ducks (Aix galericulata) in Northeastern China
TLDR
Conspecific brood parasitism (CBP) is a widespread alternative female reproductive tactic in birds and frequency was positively associated with nest densities, but there were significant differences in clutch initiation dates and mean laying period between parasitized and un-parasitized nests.
Brood parasitism, relatedness and sociality: a kinship role in female reproductive tactics
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Genetic evidence shows that also New World quails have female‐biased natal philopatry, CBP and brood merging, inviting further study and comparison with waterfowl and Kin‐related parasitism also occurs in some insects, with revealing parallels and differences compared to birds.
Female reproduction and conspecific utilisation in an egg-carrying bug : -Who carries, who cares?
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Sexual interactions resulting from female polyandry are crucial factors that maintain female egg laying on the backs of males and other females in the unique reproductive system of the golden egg bug.
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References

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Frequency, timing and costs of intraspecific nest parasitism in the common eider
TLDR
Intraspecific nest parasitism was studied in the Hudson Bay race of the Common Eider, near Churchill, Manitoba, and it was determined that 42.4% of completed clutches were parasitized.
Patterns of intraspecific nest parasitism in the High Arctic common eider (Somateria mollissima borealis)
TLDR
Intraspecific nest parasitism was studied during two breeding seasons at two common eider colonies in Kongsfjord, Svalbard and the rate of egg predation was significantly higher in parasitized than in nonparasitized nests.
Parasitic Egg Laying In Canvasbacks: Frequency, Success, and Individual Behavior
TLDR
Time-lapse photography and frequent nest checks conducted at Canvasback (Aythya valisineria) nests revealed a high frequency of intraspecific parasitic egg laying, suggesting that some females lay parasitic eggs after an initial nesting attempt is terminated early in the laying stage and before a second nest is initiated because the time-consuming task of nest building prevents them from having a second nests immediately ready to receive eggs.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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