Efforts to overcome vegetarian-induced dissonance among meat eaters

@article{Rothgerber2014EffortsTO,
  title={Efforts to overcome vegetarian-induced dissonance among meat eaters},
  author={Hank Rothgerber},
  journal={Appetite},
  year={2014},
  volume={79},
  pages={32-41}
}
Meat eaters face dissonance whether it results from inconsistency ("I eat meat; I don't like to hurt animals"), aversive consequences ("I eat meat; eating meat harms animals"), or threats to self image ("I eat meat; compassionate people don't hurt animals"). The present work proposes that there are a number of strategies that omnivores adopt to reduce this dissonance including avoidance, dissociation, perceived behavioral change, denial of animal pain, denial of animal mind, pro-meat… Expand

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