Efficacy of percutaneous and transcutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation on idiopathic overactive bladder and interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome: A systematic review and meta‐analysis

@article{GhavidelSardsahra2022EfficacyOP,
  title={Efficacy of percutaneous and transcutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation on idiopathic overactive bladder and interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome: A systematic review and meta‐analysis},
  author={Amirhossein Ghavidel-Sardsahra and Morteza Ghojazadeh and Mohammad Sajjad Rahnama’i and Amirreza Naseri and Shahabodin Yazdandoost and Taha Khezerloo and Sepideh Seyedi-Sahebari and Hossein Hosseinifard and Nafiseh Vahed and Hadi Mostafaei and Hanieh Salehi-pourmehr and Sakineh Hajebrahimi},
  journal={Neurourology and Urodynamics},
  year={2022},
  volume={41},
  pages={539 - 551}
}
Percutaneous and transcutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS and TTNS) showed a promising effect on overactive bladder (OAB) and interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. We aimed to give a systematic review and meta‐analysis on the efficacy and safety of these therapeutic methods as well. 
1 Citations

Treatment for overactive bladder: A meta-analysis of tibial versus parasacral neuromodulation

TNS and PNS had similar effectiveness for the treatment of OAB, moreover, without any identified adverse events in both groups, however, well-designed RCTs are stilled needed to verify the results.

References

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Efficacy of transcutaneous stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve compared to percutaneous stimulation in idiopathic overactive bladder syndrome: Randomized control trial

To evaluate the non‐inferiority of the transcutaneous electrical stimulation technique, as compared with the percutaneous therapy (PTNS), regarding the efficacy in symptoms and QoL improvement in

The effectiveness of transcutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (TTNS) for adults with overactive bladder syndrome: A systematic review

To evaluate effectiveness of transcutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (TTNS) for treating adults with overactive bladder (OAB) of idiopathic or neurogenic origin, using a systematic review of the

Percutaneous versus Transcutaneous Electrical Stimulation of the Posterior Tibial Nerve in Idiopathic Overactive Bladder Syndrome with Urinary Incontinence in Adults: A Systematic Review

TTNS has advantages over PTNS as it is more comfortable for the patient even though there is equality of both therapies in the outcome variables, and the greatest effectiveness, in reducing UI and in other parameters of daily voiding and quality of life, was obtained.

Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) efficacy in the treatment of lower urinary tract dysfunctions: a systematic review

PTNS is an effective and safe option to treat OAB patients and further studies are needed to assess the role of PTNS in the remaining indications and to evaluate the long term durability of the treatment.

Tibial nerve stimulation for overactive bladder syndrome unresponsive to medical therapy

  • A. RidoutW. Yoong
  • Medicine
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology : the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • 2010
Inhibition of detrusor activity by peripheral neuromodulation of the posterior tibial nerve was first described in 1983, with recent authors further confirming a 60–80% positive response rate.

Transcutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation: Ready for prime time?

This is the first head-to-head randomized controlled comparison of transcutaneous and percutaneous PTNS in overactive bladder (OAB) patients and by including only patients with detrusor overactivity (DO) Ramirez-Garcia and colleagues may have lowered the amplitude of treatments effect as some series have suggest that PTNS may be more effective in OAB patients without DO.

Efficacy of pelvic floor muscle training in women with overactive bladder syndrome: a systematic review

PFMT, with the objective of controlling urgent micturition, demonstrated improvements in quality of life in women with OAB, and the literature regarding the effectiveness of PFMT in OAB remains heterogeneous and inconclusive.