Efficacy of intracoronary nicardipine in the treatment of no‐reflow during percutaneous coronary intervention

@article{Huang2006EfficacyOI,
  title={Efficacy of intracoronary nicardipine in the treatment of no‐reflow during percutaneous coronary intervention},
  author={Raymond I Huang and Parul B Patel and Paul Walinsky and David L. Fischman and J. David Ogilby and Mark Awar and Craig Frankil and Michael P. Savage},
  journal={Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions},
  year={2006},
  volume={68}
}
Objectives: The goal of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of nicardipine in reversing no‐reflow during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Background: No‐reflow is a common complication of PCI in patients with acute coronary syndromes or venous bypass graft disease. Although nicardipine has an attractive pharmacological profile and has been used clinically to treat no‐reflow, there is a paucity of published data regarding its effectiveness in this setting. Methods: We… 
Myocardial protective effect of intracoronary administration of nicorandil and alprostadil via targeted perfusion microcatheter in patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention
TLDR
The intracoronary administration of nicorandil and alprostadil via a targeted perfusion microcatheter was more effective in improving myocardial perfusion in patients undergoing elective PCI than nitroglycerin.
Beneficial Effects of Intracoronary Nicorandil on Microvascular Dysfunction After Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Demonstration of Its Superiority to Nitroglycerin in a Cross-Over Study
TLDR
Intracoronary nicorandil reduced microvascular dysfunction after primary PCI more effectively than did nitroglycerin in patients with STEMI, probably via its KATP channel-opening effect.
Management of ‘no‐reflow’ complicating reperfusion therapy
TLDR
Intracoronary verapamil, adenosine and nitroprusside have been most frequently studied and administered for angiographic no‐reflow during PCI for acute myocardial infarction or saphenous vein graft (SVG) lesions and have been shown to improve epicardial flow and microvascular perfusion.
Intracoronary Vasodilators for the No-Reflow Phenomenon
TLDR
Prevention of no-reflow with intracoronary vasodilators in elective PCI is not warranted and nitroprusside should be considered first-line treatment in no- reflow associated with AMI.
Management of No-Reflow Phenomenon in the Catheterization Laboratory.
TLDR
Various preventive strategies for no-reflow as well as pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions that improve coronary blood flow are discussed, such as intracoronary adenosine and nitroprusside.
Dipyridamole versus verapamil for treatment of no‐reflow during primary angioplasty
  • G. Tanzilli, C. Greco, +4 authors E. Mangieri
  • Medicine
    Catheterization and cardiovascular interventions : official journal of the Society for Cardiac Angiography & Interventions
  • 2010
TLDR
Dipyridamole is a safe and effective first‐line drug for treatment of no‐reflow and can also be successfully used in patients with incomplete response to verapamil, which caused AV block in 9% of cases.
Percutaneous coronary intervention and the no-reflow phenomenon
No-reflow during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is observed most commonly during saphenous vein graft intervention, rotational atherectomy and primary PCI for acute ST-elevation myocardial
Coronary no-reflow in the modern era: a review of advances in diagnostic techniques and contemporary management
TLDR
This review outlines the cutting-edge diagnostic investigations which have been explored in no-reflow, allowing a deeper understanding of mechanism and microvascular pathological processes involved in its genesis.
Advances in Coronary No-Reflow Phenomenon—a Contemporary Review
TLDR
It is concluded that coronary no-reflow phenomenon and microvascular obstruction must be recognized as a multifactorial condition that has certain predispositions and characteristics, therefore its prevention and treatment must begin pre-procedurally and be multi-faceted including certain medications and operator techniques in the cardiac catheterization laboratory.
Percutaneous coronary intervention of totally occluded coronary venous bypass grafts: An exercise in futility?
TLDR
PCI of totally occluded SVG can be performed with a high procedural success rate, however, its clinical utility remains limited by poor follow-up outcomes.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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