Efficacy of Antioxidant Vitamins and Selenium Supplement in Prostate Cancer Prevention: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

@article{Jiang2010EfficacyOA,
  title={Efficacy of Antioxidant Vitamins and Selenium Supplement in Prostate Cancer Prevention: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials},
  author={Lei Jiang and Ke-Hu Yang and Jin-hui Tian and Quan-lin Guan and Nan Yao and Nong Cao and Deng Hai Mi and Jie Wu and Bin Ma and Sun-hu Yang},
  journal={Nutrition and Cancer},
  year={2010},
  volume={62},
  pages={719 - 727}
}
Several studies have evaluated the possible association between antioxidants vitamins or selenium supplement and the risk of prostate cancer, but the evidence is still inconsistent. We systematically searched PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, Science Citation Index Expanded, Chinese biomedicine literature database, and bibliographies of retrieved articles up to January 2009. We included 9 randomized controlled trials with 165,056 participants; methodological quality of included trials was… Expand
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