Efficacy Without Tolerance or Rebound Insomnia for Midazolam and Temazepam After Use for One to Three Months

@article{Allen1987EfficacyWT,
  title={Efficacy Without Tolerance or Rebound Insomnia for Midazolam and Temazepam After Use for One to Three Months},
  author={R. Allen and J. Mendels and D. Nevins and D. Chernik and E. Hoddes},
  journal={The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology},
  year={1987},
  volume={27}
}
Midazolam (15 mg) was compared with temazepam (30 mg) in a randomized, double‐blind, parallel group study. An initial screening period was followed by 3 days of placebo baseline, 4 to 12 weeks of nightly oral use of the medication and a 4‐day placebo withdrawal period. One hundred seventy‐five patients with chronic insomnia participated in this multicenter outpatient study. Because the elimination half‐life of midazolam, a new trizolobenzodiazepine hypnotic, is short (1.3‐2.2 hr) compared to… Expand
A STUDY COMPARING THE HYPNOTIC EFFICACIES AND RESIDUAL EFFECTS ON ACTUAL DRIVING PERFORMANCE OF MIDAZOLAM 15 MG, TRIAZOLAM 0.5 MG, TEMAZEPAM 20 MG AND PLACEBO IN SHIFTWORKERS ON NIGHT DUTY
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