Effects on weed and invertebrate abundance and diversity of herbicide management in genetically modified herbicide-tolerant winter-sown oilseed rape

@article{Bohan2005EffectsOW,
  title={Effects on weed and invertebrate abundance and diversity of herbicide management in genetically modified herbicide-tolerant winter-sown oilseed rape},
  author={D. Bohan and C. Boffey and D. Brooks and S. Clark and A. Dewar and L. Firbank and A. J. Haughton and C. Hawes and M. Heard and M. May and J. Osborne and J. Perry and P. Rothery and D. Roy and R. Scott and G. Squire and I. Woiwod and G. Champion},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2005},
  volume={272},
  pages={463 - 474}
}
We evaluated the effects of the herbicide management associated with genetically modified herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) winter oilseed rape (WOSR) on weed and invertebrate abundance and diversity by testing the null hypothesis that there is no difference between the effects of herbicide management of GMHT WOSR and that of comparable conventional varieties. For total weeds there were few treatment differences between GMHT and conventional cropping, but large and opposite treatment effects were… Expand
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