Effects of weight lifting on bone mineral density in premenopausal women

@article{Gleeson1990EffectsOW,
  title={Effects of weight lifting on bone mineral density in premenopausal women},
  author={Peggy Blake Gleeson and Elizabeth J. Protas and Adrian D. Leblanc and Victor S. Schneider and Harlan J. Evans},
  journal={Journal of Bone and Mineral Research},
  year={1990},
  volume={5}
}
A group of 68 premenopausal women participated in a controlled 12 month exercise program. Two groups were matched according to age, body size (body mass index), and typical activity level. Data collection included bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine with dual‐photon absorptiometry and of the os calcis with single‐photon absorptiometry, lean body mass, urinary calcium/creatinine, and urinary gammacarboxyglutamic acid (Gla). Subjects wer given a daily 500 mg supplement of elemental… 
Effect of resistance exercise on bone mineral density in premenopausal women.
Weight training decreases vertebral bone density in premenopausal women: a prospective study.
TLDR
It is concluded that short term weight training at this frequency and intensity decreases vertebral bone mass in premenopausal women.
A two‐year program of aerobics and weight training enhances bone mineral density of young women
TLDR
It is indicated that over a 2‐year period, a combined regimen of aerobics and weight training has beneficial effects on BMD and fitness parameters in young women, but the addition of daily calcium supplementation does not add significant benefit to the intervention.
Effects of resistance training on regional and total bone mineral density in premenopausal women: A randomized prospective study
  • T. Lohman, S. Going, R. Pamenter
  • Medicine
    Journal of bone and mineral research : the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research
  • 1995
TLDR
The results support the use of strength training for increasing STL and muscular strength with smaller but significant regional increases in BMD in the premenopausal population.
Bone Mineral Density Responses to High-Intensity Strength Training in Active Older Women
TLDR
The high-intensity weight training utilized in this study did not induce positive changes in BMD of the hip and spine of previously active, non-estrogen-repleted older women, however, the protocol was safe, enjoyable, and highly effective in increasing muscular strength.
Effects of aerobic training on bone mineral density of postmenopausal women
  • Daniel Martín, M. Notelovitz
  • Medicine
    Journal of bone and mineral research : the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research
  • 1993
TLDR
12 months of aerobic exercise training attenuated lumbar BMD loss in women who were ≤ 6 years of the onset of the menopause, and none of the forearm BMD changes in the recently menopausal subset were significant.
Weight‐training effects on bone mineral density in early postmenopausal women
TLDR
It is concluded that weight training may be a useful exercise modality for maintaining lumbar BMD in early postmenopausal women.
Exercise effects on bone mass in postmenopausal women are site‐specific and load‐dependent
  • D. Kerr, A. Morton, I. Dick, R. Prince
  • Medicine
    Journal of bone and mineral research : the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research
  • 1996
TLDR
The results support the notion of a site‐specific response of bone to maximal loading from resistance exercise in that although the trochanter and intertrochanteric bone density was elevated by the resistance exercises undertaken, there was no effect on the femoral neck value.
Effects of resistance and endurance exercise on bone mineral status of young women: A randomized exercise intervention trial
TLDR
It is demonstrated that 8 months of supervised progressive training in either running or resistance exercise modestly increases lumbar spine mineral in young women.
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