Effects of the CCK receptor antagonist MK-329 on food intake in broiler chickens.

Abstract

The cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor antagonist MK-329 (previously L-364,718) was administered intraperitoneally to free-feeding broiler chickens and tested for conditioning effects using the colored food paradigm. The 8.0, 16.0, and 32.0 micrograms/kg doses of MK-329 did not exert any effect on food intake and failed to condition a color preference or aversion. When higher doses were used (90, 180, and 360 micrograms/kg) MK-329 caused a significant increase in food intake during the 2-h test period. Intravenously injected MK-329 (70, 140, and 280 micrograms/kg) produced an increase in food intake, with maximum increases occurring at a dose of 70 micrograms/kg. CCK (14 micrograms/kg) caused a reduction in feeding, and this effect was not blocked by pretreatment with intraperitoneal injection of MK-329 (32, 90, 180, and 360 micrograms/kg). The results question the role of endogenous CCK in satiety in chickens.

Cite this paper

@article{Covasa1994EffectsOT, title={Effects of the CCK receptor antagonist MK-329 on food intake in broiler chickens.}, author={Mihai Covasa and J Michael Forbes}, journal={Pharmacology, biochemistry, and behavior}, year={1994}, volume={48 2}, pages={479-86} }