Effects of subthalamic deep brain stimulation on blink abnormalities of 6-OHDA lesioned rats.

@article{Kaminer2015EffectsOS,
  title={Effects of subthalamic deep brain stimulation on blink abnormalities of 6-OHDA lesioned rats.},
  author={Jaime Kaminer and Pratibha Thakur and Craig Evinger},
  journal={Journal of neurophysiology},
  year={2015},
  volume={113 9},
  pages={
          3038-46
        }
}
Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned rat model share blink abnormalities. In view of the evolutionarily conserved organization of blinking, characterization of blink reflex circuits in rodents may elucidate the neural mechanisms of PD reflex abnormalities. We examine the extent of this shared pattern of blink abnormalities by measuring blink reflex excitability, blink reflex plasticity, and spontaneous blinking in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. We also… 
Translational neurophysiology of Parkinson's disease: can't blink on an eye blink.
  • A. Shaikh
  • Psychology, Biology
    Journal of neurophysiology
  • 2015
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