Effects of stress throughout the lifespan on the brain, behaviour and cognition

@article{Lupien2009EffectsOS,
  title={Effects of stress throughout the lifespan on the brain, behaviour and cognition},
  author={Sonia J. Lupien and Bruce S. McEwen and Megan R. Gunnar and Christine M. Heim},
  journal={Nature Reviews Neuroscience},
  year={2009},
  volume={10},
  pages={434-445}
}
Chronic exposure to stress hormones, whether it occurs during the prenatal period, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood or aging, has an impact on brain structures involved in cognition and mental health. However, the specific effects on the brain, behaviour and cognition emerge as a function of the timing and the duration of the exposure, and some also depend on the interaction between gene effects and previous exposure to environmental adversity. Advances in animal and human studies… 

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