Effects of screentime on the health and well-being of children and adolescents: a systematic review of reviews

@article{Stiglic2019EffectsOS,
  title={Effects of screentime on the health and well-being of children and adolescents: a systematic review of reviews},
  author={Neza Stiglic and Russell M. Viner},
  journal={BMJ Open},
  year={2019},
  volume={9}
}
OBJECTIVES To systematically examine the evidence of harms and benefits relating to time spent on screens for children and young people's (CYP) health and well-being, to inform policy. [...] Key MethodMETHODS Systematic review of reviews undertaken to answer the question 'What is the evidence for health and well-being effects of screentime in children and adolescents (CYP)?' Electronic databases were searched for systematic reviews in February 2018.Expand
The relationship between screen time and mental health in young people: A systematic review of longitudinal studies.
TLDR
The impact of increased screen time on the prevalence of mental health problems among young people is likely to be negligible or small, and further longitudinal studies that examine screen content and motivations underlying screen use are required.
Dose-dependent and joint associations between screen time, physical activity, and mental wellbeing in adolescents: an international observational study.
TLDR
Higher levels of screen time and lower levels of physical activity were associated with lower life satisfaction and higher psychosomatic complaints among adolescents from high-income countries and public health strategies to promote adolescents' mental wellbeing should aim to decreaseScreen time and increase physical activity simultaneously.
Measurement of screen time among young children aged 0–6 years: A systematic review
  • R. Byrne, C. Terranova, S. Trost
  • Medicine
    Obesity reviews : an official journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity
  • 2021
TLDR
Measures of screen time have generally evolved to reflect children's contemporary digital landscape; however, the psychometric properties of measurement tools are rarely reported and there is a need for improved measures and reporting to capture the complexity of children's screen time exposures.
The Differential Impact of Screen Time on Children’s Wellbeing
TLDR
This study explored the effect of leisure screen time and gender on dimensions of wellbeing in a national sample of 897 Irish primary school children aged 8–12 years and found no significant interaction between screen time category (<2 h/2 h + daily) and gender and overall wellbeing, while controlling for BMI.
Sleep, screen time and behaviour problems in preschool children: an actigraphy study
TLDR
The link between screen time and behaviour problems was moderated by sleep duration, as it was significant only for children with sleep duration of 9.88 h or less per night, underscoring the importance of the moderating role of sleep.
The Associations of Physical Activity and Screen-2 Time Behaviour with Mental Health in a Nationwide 3 Sample of Kazakhstan Adolescents 4
Mental health problems during adolescence is a serious public health issue in the Republic 17 of Kazakhstan. Early detection is necessary alongside population level monitoring. Physical 18 inactivity
Screen time and problem behaviors in children: exploring the mediating role of sleep duration
TLDR
There was strong evidence that longer sleep duration was associated with reduced problem behaviors, and other potential mediating variables need to be investigated in future research.
The Associations of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour with Mental Health in a Nationwide Sample of Kazakhstan Adolescents
As mental health problems tend to increase during adolescence and is a serious public health issue in the Republic of Kazakhstan. Early detection is necessary and monitoring at the population level
Quality of Life and Meeting 24-h WHO Guidelines Among Preschool Children in Singapore
TLDR
The results show that the health-related quality of life of preschool children increased with the number of World Health Organisation guidelines accomplished, and parents' reports determined the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™, collected online at the same time.
Association Between Leisure Screen Time and Emotional and Behavioural Problems in Spanish Children.
TLDR
Significant associations between daily leisure screen time and emotional and behavioural problems in Spanish children between 6 and 14 years are found, but these findings should be confirmed in cohort studies, so institutions might consider including screen time as a new risk factor for children.
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