Effects of repeated administration of amphetamine on behavioral vigilance: evidence for “sensitized” attentional impairments

Abstract

The effects of repeated intermittent administration of amphetamine (1, 2, 3 mg/kg, IP) on the performance of rats in a task designed to assess sustained attention were tested. A substantial increase in the number of false alarms (i.e., “claims” for hits in non-signal trials) was observed following subsequent administrations of amphetamine. This effect could not be accounted for by drug-induced side or position biases, switching behavior or stereotypy. The effects of repeated amphetamine may model some of the cognitive processes which mediate the attribution of incentive salience to stimuli associated with repeated psychostimulant administration and the development of psychostimulant-induced psychotic symptoms.

DOI: 10.1007/s002130050637

2 Figures and Tables

Statistics

05001000'00'02'04'06'08'10'12'14'16
Citations per Year

2,357 Citations

Semantic Scholar estimates that this publication has 2,357 citations based on the available data.

See our FAQ for additional information.

Cite this paper

@article{Deller1998EffectsOR, title={Effects of repeated administration of amphetamine on behavioral vigilance: evidence for “sensitized” attentional impairments}, author={Thomas Deller and Martin Sarter}, journal={Psychopharmacology}, year={1998}, volume={137}, pages={410-414} }